ISSUE 26-27 | Spring/Fall 2016

Post-what? Post-when? Thinking Moving Images Beyond the Post-medium/Post-cinema Condition

Edited by Miriam De Rosa and Vinzenz Hediger

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If we live in a post-media and post-cinema condition, how much longer will it last, and how will it end? Picking up on the recent debate about post-media and post-cinema, this special issue of Cinéma & Cie addresses the question of temporality and periodization in media history and asks what exactly the ‘post’ in post-cinema means. The contributions approach this question from a variety of perspectives and discuss a number of key issues, from the question of medium ontology to that of medium specificity, from the development of digital and hybrid cinematic forms to the problems and pitfalls of preservation. Exploring new analytical and theoretical frameworks that account for the moving image in the multiplicity of its configurations, the contributions open up new avenues of research and provide a sense of what may lie beyond our current post-medium and post-cinema condition.


Contents / Table des matières

Post-what? Post-when? Thinking Moving Images Beyond the Post-medium/Post-cinema Condition

Miriam De Rosa and Vinzenz Hediger, Post-what? Post-when? A Conversation on the ‘Posts’ of Post-media and Post-cinema

Shane Denson, Speculation, Transition, and the Passing of Post-cinema

Ted Nannicelli, Malcom Turvey, Against Post-cinema

Sabrina Negri, Simulating the Past: Digital Preservation of Moving Images and the ‘End of Cinema’

Rachel Schaff, The Photochemical Conditions of the Frame

Saige Walton, Becoming Space in Every Direction: Birdman as Post-cinematic Baroque

Monica Dall’Asta, GIF Art in the Metamodern Era

New Studies

Diego Cavallotti, Elisa Virgili, Queering the Amateur Analog Video Archive: the Case of Bologna’s Countercultural Life in the 80s and the 90s

Simone Dotto, Notes for a History of Radio-Film: Cinematic Imagination and Intermedia Forms in Early Italian Radio

Francesco Federici, The Experience of Duration and the Manipulation of Time in Exposed Cinema

Kamil Lipiński, Archival Hauntings in the Revenant Narratives from Home in Péter Forgács’ Private Hungary

Projects & Abstracts

Reviews / Comptes-rendus

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